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Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN)

Frequently Asked Questions

Access answers to frequently asked questions (FAQ) related to different aspects of the Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN) program.

Gang Set-Aside Funding FAQs

A “Gang Task Force” is any coordinated effort involving more than one federal, state, local, or tribal law enforcement agency to collaboratively investigate and prosecute criminal and/or transnational organizations that are committing the crimes listed in the PSN Authorization Act (high levels of violent crime, firearms offenses, human trafficking, and drug trafficking). A task force does not need to be led by or include participation of a federal agency; a task force composed entirely of state, local, and/or tribal agencies can qualify. If a federal agency is involved, it may not receive grant funds.

No. The collaborative, coordinated effort does not need to be officially designated a “Gang Task Force,” so long as it is focused on the investigation and prosecution of criminal and/or transnational organizations engaging in the categories of offenses outlined in the Act.

No. Both pre-existing and newly created “Gang Task Forces” may qualify for the 30% set-aside funds under the Act.

Yes, provided that the PSN Team is focused, at least in part, on the investigation and prosecution of criminal and/or transnational organizations that are engaged in high levels of violent crime, firearms offenses, human trafficking, and drug trafficking.

Yes, as long as this collaboration is focused, at least in part, on the investigation and prosecution of criminal and/or transnational organizations committing the categories of offenses identified in the PSN Authorization Act.

No, but the 30% set-aside funds must be used for collaborative, coordinated law enforcement efforts focused on criminal and/or transnational organizations, which includes but is not limited to gangs, that are engaged in high levels of violent crime, firearms offenses, human trafficking, and drug trafficking.

No. The 30% set-aside funds may be used for non-enforcement activities, such as outreach, prevention, and reentry programs, so long as the funds are used to address criminal and/or transnational organizations that are committing the categories of offenses outlined in the Act.

For this purpose, a “criminal organization” is a group of two or more individuals that exists for a period of time and that acts in concert with the aim of committing any of the categories of offenses outlined in the PSN Authorization Act, whether successful or not.

For this purpose, a “transnational organization” is a group of two or more individuals, one or more of whom is a citizen of a foreign country, that exists for a period of time and that acts in concert with the aim of committing any of the categories of offenses outlined in the PSN Authorization Act, whether successful or not.

No. As long as individuals associated with the criminal and/or transnational organization are acting in concert with the aim of committing the identified offenses in your district, the organization may be based elsewhere. For example, a criminal and/or transnational organization based in District A may illegally distribute firearms or narcotics in adjacent Districts B and C. The 30% set-aside funds may be used for collaborative, coordinated law enforcement efforts aimed at investigating and prosecuting firearms and narcotic offenses in Districts B and C that result from the actions of a criminal and/or transnational organization based in District A or elsewhere.

What constitutes a “high level” of a particular crime will vary from district to district. Each district should examine local crime conditions to determine what threshold to use when assessing whether a criminal and/or transnational organization is engaged in high levels of the categories of crime identified in the PSN Authorization Act.

Date Created: November 19, 2020